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Field of Nightmares

In October 1989 both of the San Francisco Bay area professional baseball teams, the Giants from San Francisco and the A's from Oakland, made it to the World Series. This never happened before (nor since). Sutro Tower Video was there, documenting the pre series hyperbole and cultural oddity, and, when immediately before game three a 7.0 earthquake struck Northern California, documenting that as well.

Field of Nightmares

A final subtext of the story revolved around Proposition P of that year (the city props went up at least to letter "V," which is never a good sign). Prop P was a vote on building a China Basin (so called "downtown") ballpark. The voters of the city had just voted against such a creature in 1987. We were hounded with the prospect of losing the Giants (most felt they would head to San Jose) if the ballpark proposition failed. We were chided with the idea that a "world class city" requires a world class baseball team. Such b.s.

Field of Nightmares

For me, it was particularly irritating that Art Agnos, mayor at the time, was the biggest cheerleader mouth for building the edifice. He'd run on a platform denying the need for a new park, but once the power and lure of corporation got to him, his tune quickly changed. He lost my vote in his next election, and evidently a lot of others as well, as he was a one term mayor.

Field of Nightmares

The Giants lost the series 4 games to 0, and didn't look to be very world class while doing it. The 3rd game was delayed ten days due to the quake. Proposition P barely lost at the polls a week or so later, but, as could have been expected, it was on the ballot again a few years later and did pass. Once it's built, it's built, no one has put a proposition on the ballot to tear it down. Very unlikely to happen with the population demographics of San Francisco nowadays.

Field of Nightmares

Immediately as commentator and ex-pitcher Jim Palmer of ABC Sports said, referencing Mike Moore, the Oakland pitcher, that "He has trouble with the thrown ball," he knocked a pitch into center field for a double, the first time an American League pitcher had made a hit in a world series in many years. (There is no designated hitter in the National League ball parks during the World Series games.)

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More Stills from the Video:

Field of Nightmares: stills

Rev. 2015